Sign In / Up

Add contribution as a guest

Your email will not be displayed publicly
Benefit of signing in/signing up to personalize comment

Comment as a guest

Your email will not be displayed publicly
Benefit of signing in/signing up to personalize comment

Login

Not a member Register   Forgot Password
or connect using
 

Email

 

Rudaw

Opinion

What drives ISIS to stalk free Yezidis in Canada?

By DAVID ROMANO 6/2/2019
-
-
This week, five Yezidi women in Canada as refugees – including a 14-year old girl – filed a complaint with Canadian police about continued harassment from Islamic State (ISIS) supporters. The women have been receiving threatening phone calls, graphic e-mails and abusive messages.

According to Canadian news source W5, the women “have handed over to police recordings of the phone calls and screen grabs of the texts, which reference the Islamic State and include pictures of beheadings and armed Jihadis. W5 has listened to the phone calls. In one, a man laughs as he says in Arabic: ‘I am the man who f****d you. I am your rapist.’ A second caller denounces Yazidis as devil worshippers. And a third caller makes a graphic reference to rape. The callers appear to have Iraqi, North African and Gulf state accents. York Regional Police have assembled a team to try to track where the calls are originating.”

Similar stories emerged during the past few years from Yezidi refugees in Germany and other countries. 

To these accounts we must add the grim truth that some 30,000 people from outside Syria and Iraq voluntarily traveled to these countries to join ISIS and fight for the group. Contrary to popular belief, these foreign ISIS volunteers were mostly not poor, deprived or even very devout Muslims. A recent study of ISIS volunteers from Saudi Arabia found their religious education and knowledge limited, while their socio-economic situation was generally good. In another 2018 study from the journal “Terrorism and Political Violence,” Efraim Benmelech and Esteban Klor examined statistical data regarding all the known ISIS foreign fighters, and found that: “…poor economic conditions do not drive participation in ISIS.  In contrast, the number of ISIS foreign fighters is positively correlated with a country's GDP per capita and its Human Development Index (HDI). In fact, many foreign fighters originate from countries with high levels of economic development, low income inequality, and highly developed political institutions.”

In other words, a disproportionate number of these ISIS volunteers came from wealthy European countries – places with good education systems, excellent social services, and wealthy economies. Why would people from such “lands of opportunity” use their own money to travel to Turkey, and then cross the Syrian border to join ISIS? According to Benmelech and Klor, first and second-generation Muslim immigrants to Europe often face difficulties assimilating or being accepted in their new societies. As a result, they become susceptible to ISIS propaganda and radicalization. So instead of volunteering to help earthquake victims in Iran or working in a refugee camp or something, such people choose to go to Syria, join ISIS and behead and rape Yezidis and others.

That may be part of the story, but this columnist feels unsatisfied by such explanations. We still have all the ISIS volunteers from the Arab Gulf countries and North Africa to account for, as well as the Iraqi and Syrian ISIS members who did not join the group out of duress. 

The continued harassment of Yezidi refugees in fact points to a much darker, sinister explanation for ISIS’ popularity. Simply put, a lot of people in the world harbor fantasies of owning slaves, raping women and feeling powerful. They went and joined ISIS for self-gratification. They saw a group and ideology that would permit them to indulge in their sickest fantasies while simultaneously promising them hero status, absolution and perhaps martyrdom if things went badly. Female ISIS volunteers dreamed of marrying dark knights and feeling similarly empowered. That was enough for them to give up decent lives and good jobs in pleasant countries and buy airline tickets to Turkey, travel to Syria and risk their lives fighting for ISIS. Some who made it back from “the Caliphate,” or others who never went but like to live vicariously through those who did, now keep entertaining themselves by harassing the victims who survived the whole ISIS monstrosity – such as the five Yezidi women in Canada. All of which must make us seriously lose faith in humanity. 

Before losing complete faith, however, one need only remember the volunteers who went to join the Syrian Kurdish-led forces or the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga fighting ISIS. These people left the comforts of their homes not for rape and pillage-filled adventures, but to protect the defenseless and stop the madness of ISIS. At the same time that foreign ISIS volunteers should face the harshest of punishments for their choice, these opposite kinds of volunteers should have received heroes’ welcomes when they returned home. Those still in Iraq and Syria fighting ISIS remnants should likewise not be forgotten.

David Romano has been a Rudaw columnist since 2010. He holds the Thomas G. Strong Professor of Middle East Politics at Missouri State University and is the author of numerous publications on the Kurds and the Middle East.


The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rudaw.

Comments

 
wasi | 6/2/2019
Believe or not in certain countries like Denmark Sweden UK and Germany the murdering jihadist rapist who return get "reintegrated" into society with free housing, education etc while Kurds and others who traveled to Kurdistan to join Kurds fight ISIS are actually facing trail! We all saw the shiny new weapons the US coalltion handed over to the Islamist/jihadist "opposition" in Iraq and Syria (many of whom later joined Al Qaeda or ISIS) and the pathetic light weapons (most outdated) they delivered to Kurdish fighters. Even the Iranian controlled Shia millitias who are now threatning US troops on a daily bases got heavy US weapons, but not Kurds.
dellinger | 6/2/2019
This is nothing, wait a generation or two and watch what'll happen. The Islamists in the west have changed tactics, they're becoming increasingly better at "blending in", using their votes, entering poleitcs, encouraging their followers to have many children etc. But the West deserve everything coming their way with regards to these people, I mean ok the north africans came a long time ago and not much to do about that but why the F take in tens of thousands of Arab/Turkmen from Iraq and Syria? even more Afghanies!
Masque du Furet | 6/2/2019
I agree ISIS members from western countries are not that poor and illiterate. There is another point of view, however (which is not on the Canadian topic) : there are lots of ISIS fighters coming from Central Asia (kyrghiz, Chechens, Kazakhs; maybe UIghurs) and I know they are among the fiecest fighters -perhaps the last ones in Hajin- . I do not think they have the same socio economical background than Canadian/German/French ISIS fighters.
Jay | 6/2/2019
You have far too easily discounted the theology of Islam, which not only approves of what ISIS members have been doing, but in fact mandates it. ISIS is not "nothing to do with Islam". ISIS is Islam - carried out to the letter, every "i" dotted, every "t" crossed.
Dara | 7/2/2019
be careful if you are kurd and business owner with no family or friends around. a kurd was fatally attacked some weeks ago with machete in toronto by shiaas. no questions asked and almost no mentions in media.
Post a New Comment
Comment as a guest or Login for more enhanced interactive experience
Tags : ISIS, Canada

Be Part of Your Rudaw!

Share your stories, photos and videos with Rudaw, and quite possibly the world.

What You Say

Pakistani | 2/16/2019 3:28:42 AM
Turkey is a terrorist state , has been killing innocent Kurds for ages ....
parasitePKK | 2/17/2019 3:54:11 AM
As long as the PKK is there Turkey has the right to defend themselves. PKK is a parasite against the Kurds.
Kurdish villagers driven off their mountainsides by Turkish airstrikes
| yesterday at 11:12 | (2)
josfe | 2/14/2019 4:59:43 AM
And this man is a graduate with masters ? A college kid would be more objektive and wouldnt let his own opinion shine through.
David | 2/17/2019 1:36:54 AM
Solid analysis and proposal!
Rojava and Turkey: A classic case in colonialism
| 13/2/2019 | (5)
guest2002 | 2/15/2019 8:20:41 PM
The attack was on armed forces . Since when that is called terrorism??? Mollas ruling Iran have terrified Iranians for 40 years now. They kill...
Erbilguy | 2/17/2019 1:17:06 AM
@guest2002 So Isis beheading peshmergas was not terrorism?
United Nations encourages states to help Iran after terror attack killed 27
| 15/2/2019 | (8)
Dutchman | 2/16/2019 11:33:33 PM
Macron is right. When Putin talks about an "inter-Syrian political dialogue" he means that Assad and his Alawit minority regime stays in power with...
Macron, Putin weigh ‘deteriorated’ situation in Syria
| 15 hours ago | (1)

Elsewhere on Rudaw

Trump requests countries to repatriate foreign ISIS suspects from Syria 3 hours ago |

Trump requests countries to repatriate foreign ISIS suspects from Syria

"The United States is asking Britain, France, more
Could Brexit pull Britain to the political center? 6 hours ago |

Could Brexit pull Britain to the political center?

Marx famously said that history repeats itself, more
0.203 seconds